SISTERS FOR CHANGE MONITORING FRAMEWORK

International human rights frameworks to advance and protect women’s human rights often seem very far from the grassroots experiences and lived realities of marginalised women experiencing discrimination and violence on a daily basis.

To overcome this distance, Sisters For Change has translated the due diligence principle — the obligation of States to prevent, protect against and respond to violence against women (Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Article 4) — into a simple five step monitoring framework that we call the Sisters For Change Due Diligence Wheel.

WHY DO WE MONITOR JUSTICE SYSTEMS?

2%
of registered rape
cases lead to a
conviction in India

+392

Laws and regulations
in Indonesia discriminate
against women

1 in 30

Fewer than 1 in 30 of rape
victims in the UK see their
attacker brought to justice

603 million

women still live in countries
where domestic violence is
not considered a crime

74-94%

of people think that a husband
is allowed to rape his wife

DUE DILLIGENCE WHEEL

Our trained community paralegals and partners track cases of violence against women using this framework and monitor barriers to justice or where the State is failing in its response. They then use this evidence to hold the State to account and advocate for improved implementation or reform of domestic VAWG laws.

Prevent

0.4%
of the EU budget between
2007-2013 was dedicated to
spending on women’s rights
and equality

Protect

603 million
women live in a country
where there is no law
against domestic violence

Investigate

4 in 10
murders of women globally
are committed by husbands,
partners or boyfriends

Punish

70%
of perpetrators of violence
against women and girls
experience no legal sanction

Remedy & Repair

– 31%
UK Govt. cut service provision
(shelters, counselling, rehabilitation
services) to VAW survivors
by a third between 2011-12

DUE DILIGENCE WHEEL

Our trained Community Paralegals and partners track cases of violence against women using this framework and monitor barriers to justice or where the State is failing in its response. They then use this evidence to hold the State to account and advocate for improved implementation or reform of domestic VAWG laws.

Prevent

States are required to create effective policies, systems and structures that identify the types and prevalence of violence against women and girls (VAWG); address the root causes of VAWG; and reduce/prevent incidents of VAWG. Prevention includes legislative reform for out-dated discriminatory laws in order to prevent VAWG.

Protect

States are required to develop appropriate legislative frameworks, policing systems and judicial procedures (such as restraining orders, expulsion orders and victim protection procedures) to provide the necessary protection for all women and girls, including a safe environment for women to report acts of violence and gain legal assistance, medical care and support services.

Investigate

The duty of investigation is not conditional upon the State being guilty, directly or indirectly, of misconduct itself. The duty to investigate is triggered where there is a credible claim that a person has been subjected to serious violence, torture or inhuman or degrading treatment at the hands of a private party.

Punish

The obligation to punish imposed on the State the duty to prosecute and punish perpetrators effectively and appropriately.

Remedy & Repair

States must provide adequate reparations for acts of violence against women and girls. This involves providing access to criminal and civil remedies, and the establishment of effective rehabilitation and support services for women survivors of violence. Compensation for acts of violence against women and girls may include payment of monetary damages.

SISTERS FOR CHANGE REPORTS

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